Dragon Dice!

Dragon Dice is a collectable dice game produced by TSR. The are (currently) nine races to play with, and you can play with any combination of them.

This page contains cool stuff about Dragon Dice, at least the races I play.


The Races


Selumariare a mixture of blue and green, the elements air and water. Their homeland is the coastland terrain. As one of the earliest races to be published by TSR, they have very few special advantages (except that all of their icons are easy to decipher). They do count manoeuvers as saves in coastlands and they do have blue magic, something no evil race has (yet - although Frostwings will) which allows them to summon the blue dragon, which while not as spectacularly devastating as the red dragon, has the nice ability to paralise an entire enemy army (they cannot even fight back to kill the dragon). Not only does that prevent the enemy from attacking, it prevents him from doing the most dangerous thing he can: manoeuvering and counter-manoeuvering against you.

Good units: Not too many. As an early race, they sort of got cheated, but...


Vagha are a mixture of red and gold, the elements fire and earth. Their homeland is the highland terrain (perhaps they are Scotsmen in disguise). Also an early race, they are not particularly spectacular, although there are a few exceptions to that rule. They double their manoeuvers in highlands, making their charges doubly dangerous (at least). "Transmute Rock to Mud" is a valuable gold spell to cast upon your enemies, and "Path" can let your smaller units escape the dreaded "Mutate" ability of the Swampstalkers. And, of course, the red dragon and the gold dragon are both very fearsome monsters, although their breath weapons are both very straightforward, and don't help any strategy subtler than mass destruction.

Good units: Dwarves are tough all around, and not bad at all, but a few dice stand out...


Amazons are humans not based upon any element. This means that they cannot specialise in any colour of magic. The colour of the magic depends upon the colour of the terrain they occupy. However, this should always be the flatland terrain, as this is their homeland. In flatlands, Amazons can count their manoeuver results as missile results. In the reserve, they can also use their missile results to attack enemies at their home terrain when the whole reserve rolls for magic. That's pretty cool.

Good units: Amazons were in the first kicker pack, and they ended up with several good dice and dice combinations...


Firewalkers are a race of beings from the sun, made up of blue and red (air and fire). While not strictly a good-alligned race, they are not specifically evil, so I play them. They do not have a homeland per se, but their race's special ability to move from any terrain with blue in it to any other terrain during the movement phase without going to the reserve at all. This saves a step and keeps your units safe from the "Mutate" ability of Swampstalkers. In addition to being able to cast any normal blue and red spells (which allows them to summon the two best [possibly] dragons, the red and blue dragons), Firewalkers also have some new blue and red spells available only to them. Most of them aren't anything special, but with red "Elemental Blast," blue "Elemental Blast," and enough extra magic points, you can negate any spell in the game (think: "Open Grave"). As the second kicker pack, Firewalkers have lots of good units. There is also "Flashfire," which lets you re-roll any one die of yours until the begining of your next turn.

Good units: There are a lot of them, but these are the best of the best...


The Feral are a race of humanoid animals made of blue and gold (air and earth). They have no homeland, but this means that their special ability does not depend upon being at a particular terrain. Their ability is to be fruitful and multiply. At the begining of each turn, if you have any common Feral units in your dead pile, you may place one at every terrain where you have any other Feral units. They can cast any blue or gold spells from the basic rules (allowing them to summon my favourite dragon, the blue wyrm), and they also have a few new spells of their own. One of the better ones is the gold spell "Backlash," which, when cast upon a terrain, forces any army there to save against damage equal to the magic points they expend there. Some good blue spells are "Call of the Wild," which summons any one Feral unit (of yours) from any terrain to this one (neatly defeating the "Mutate" ability of Swampstalkers), and "Wilding," which lets you double the melee or save results of any unit of your choice in the target army until the begining of your next turn. When combined with TRUMPET, that's pretty good.

Good units: As might be expected, there are a few especially good units in this kicker pack...


Promotional Dice are not actually a race, but some of them are actually units, and so worth mentioning here. You can't normally find them in a store, they are sold at some conventions and available at some contests and other special events.


Magestorm!


Dragonkin are dragons aspiring to be units. Or vice virca. The are treated like units, but have to be summoned with a multi-colour spell "Summon Dragonkin," which costs two magic points per hit point of dragonkin you summon. The dragonkin come to the army the caster is in, and cannot move or go to the reserve (as far as I know) and the cease to exist if the army they are with all leaves the terrain where they are, as an army cannot consist of dragonkin alone. Rare dragonkin have breath weapons, although some are better than others, and all dragonkin have automatic saves equal to their hit points (unless they roll a BELLY icon, which they have one of, apiece). Since they aren't units, they go to that amorphous place dragons go to when they die (I call it "Atlanta") rather than the graveyard. This means they can't be buried by black magic. They make CANTRIP truly worthwhile, since your average CANTRIP can summon two points of dragonkin every time it is rolled, giving you automatic saves and something easy to bring back if it is killed. Not only that, but by summoning your entire dragonkin pool, you make your army one third again as large as your hit point limit. Sort of like the Swampstalker "Mutate" ability.

Good units: There is no such thing as a bad dragonkin, however, some are especially useful...

Drawbacks: Yes, there are some...

Magic Items and Artifacts are four-sided dice (artifacts are ten-sided) of one colour each. They cannot exist alone, but must each be carried by a different unit of a race that is made up partly of that colour. Amazons can carry any colour item (except black) and multi-coloured Promotional Dice can carry any colour at all. Magic items have only one kind of icon, and there are only twenty different types of item (although having five different colours of each makes one hundred differnet dice). Each item specialises in one action, and is covered with icons for that action alone. Their inclusion in your army assures that you will roll at least one of whatever kind you put in, but, as they count against you hit point limit (each item or artifact has hit points based upon its rarity) even though they cannot be removed to account for damage. Also, they cannot be used in the reserve at all.

Good items: These dice are pretty straightforward, with nothing interesting enough to set certain dice aside, except for a couple...


Minor Terrain are small eight-sided dice in the same colours as normal terrain. When you make a successful manoeuver roll, you can choose to put into play a minor terrain instead of moving the terrain die where you are. Every time you use the army that controlls a minor terrain, you roll the minor terrain. It probably will roll an icon that lets you do melee or missile or magic, regardless of where the major terrain is located. Or it might double your saves or manoeuvers. However, it might roll the one bad face, which are detailed below.

Bad Faces: These one in eight chances can do some pretty bad things to your army, and make you lose your minor terrain, but some are blessings in disguise...


The Dice Commander's Manual


The Dice Commander's Manual is a recent publication by TSR that sumarises all the rules in the rulebooks that came in the starter box, the kicker packs, and the Magestorm! expansion, as well as offering a few optional rules of its own. It lists all available spells, including those in forthcoming kicker packs 6, 7, and 8 and some new spells for the first four races. The Dice Commander's Manual also contains spell cards for all the new and old spells, just like the Dragon Shield accessory, as well as several FAQ lists and three Campaign Scenarios. However, while worth looking at, the book may not be worth its $18.95 price tag.

Good Spells: The best aspect of The Dice Commander's Manual is the inclusion of new spells for the first four races. Some of course, particularly stand out...

Wait! What about the Amazons? Are there no new spells for them? Inexcusably, no. As usual, Amazons have been cheated. The hardest race to buy, they are again disadvantaged be having no unique racial spells. Admittedly, magic is not supposed to be their forte, but it seems unfair.

Elder Monsters. The Dice Commander's Manual does hint very strongly that the first five races will have a fifth monster of great power added to their ranks at some time, but when and how is not made clear. Hmm....


That's all that's here right now. To see some more good stuff about dragon dice, go to The Official Dragon Dice Page, Morthalion's Dragon Dice page, or to Newsbytes about Dragon Dice. There are links to them from my home page.